Protect Your College Students Possessions

Do you have a young adult heading off to college? College can be a fun time for the student but a stressful one for the parent. Reduce some of the stress by planning ahead to make sure your college student has appropriate insurance protection while away at school. Insurance companies cover full-time students under age 25 in various ways. You’ll want to consult your agent with questions about your specific policy and situation. There are three basic ways a college student may have coverage: As a percentage of the personal property limit on the parents’ homeowner policy. Many insurance companies consider campus housing a secondary residence for the student and may cover your student’s possessions as a percentage of the personal property limit on your homeowner policy – personal property means items you can remove from your home or premises. For example, if you have $75,000 in personal property coverage, your student may have 10 percent of that, or up to $7,500, in coverage for belongings taken to school. Liability coverage – which insures legal liability for bodily injury or property damage to others – may not be included. As part of the personal property limit included in the parents’ homeowner policy. Some insurance companies offer broader coverage through their homeowner policies. These companies allow the parents’ personal property limit to include the student’s belongings and liability without defining a percentage. For example, if you have $75,000 in personal property coverage on your homeowner policy, this includes items you have in your home as well as those that your student takes to school, and liability coverage is automatically included. Under a...

How to rent a car without borrowing trouble

If your travel plans include use of a rental car, a little knowledge about auto insurance could preserve your peace of mind and save you money. Before you rent, consult with your insurance agent and check your policy for coverage, limits and deductible amounts. You may be able to save money by declining the insurance offered by the rental company if your own policy provides the coverage you need. OTHER THAN COLLISION If you are involved in an accident while driving a rental, you could be liable for damage to the auto and any resulting injuries. You could also be responsible for the rental agency’s lost income and the diminished value of the rental car, if damaged. In addition, you may be responsible for losses other than collision, such as fire, theft or vandalism, while the rental is in your possession. OTHER DRIVERS Drivers already named on your personal auto policy may be covered for use of a rental car within the United States. However, if the rental contract limits who can drive the vehicle, be aware of the restrictions and act accordingly. Some personal auto policies are contingent on the language of the rental contract, so you may not be covered if you let someone else drive the vehicle. And, if you don’t have an auto policy of your own, the rental company’s insurance may be your only option. COLLISION Some personal auto policies cover collision losses to rental cars only if you already have collision coverage on your owned autos, subject to the policy deductible. Other policies offer “first-dollar” coverage on rented vehicles through their liability coverage, meaning...

The Rise Of The Drone

You’ve seen news articles on them. You’ve seen posts on the internet about them. You might even have seen them flying around your neighborhood. Perhaps on Halloween you’ve seen a flying apparatus with a ghost attached to it floating down your street, or perhaps you’ve seen something flying above your house and wondered if a camera was taking pictures of you. These unmanned aircraft systems (UASes), also known as drones, are aircraft systems without a human pilot on board. Instead, they are controlled by an operator on the ground. If you haven’t seen one in action yet, just wait. Hobbyists purchased about 1.9 million drones in 2016, and the Federal Aviation Administration estimates that purchases might grow to as many as 4.3 million by 2020. Businesses are also beginning to purchase drones for commercial purposes, with the number expected to grow from 600,000 in 2016 to 2.7 million by 2020, according to the FAA. Companies are turning to drones for aerial photography, real estate, construction, agriculture, advertising, search and rescue, landscaping, insurance and many other uses. When entering into the world of drones, a number of rules and regulations must be followed, some of which are detailed on the FAA’s UAS website and Fact Sheet on Small Unmanned Aircraft Regulations. In August 2016, the FAA implemented a UAS rule known as Part 107, which applies to small drones weighing 55 pounds or less and requires operators to fly under 400 feet within visual line of sight and only during daylight hours. If businesses wish to fly outside of these parameters, then a waiver may be requested. According to the...

Special Event Insurance

Every weekend the calendar seems to offer a menu of festivals, 5K races and concerts. No matter what the weather, there is something special to do. Some folks plan their leisure time around any number of school, church or community events. If your business or organization is planning a special event, you may be experiencing some of the common worries. What happens if a patron gets hurt? What if there is damage to the property of others as a result of the event? Are there other, unforeseen exposures? You may have similar concerns if you are a crafter who sells your goods at weekend festivals. The event sponsor may ask you to provide a certificate of insurance demonstrating that you have liability coverage. You can protect yourself, your business or organization, its assets and your employees or club members by purchasing special events coverage. Special events may share some common elements that might not be covered by the policy your business or organization already has in force: A special event may be held away from your normal site of operations. Entry may require an admission. There may be activities that are outside the scope of typical operations. Attendance may involve those who do not normally interact with your business or organization. The events are often of a short term, perhaps held on one day or over a weekend. Speak to your local Bolder, Personal & Business Insurance Agent and be ready to answer questions to help tailor the coverage in your policy to the event you’re planning: Who is sponsoring the event, and is there already some special event insurance...

Former Elite Runner Sponsors Bolder Boulder

Article from the Colorado Runner Former Elite Runner Sponsors Bolder Boulder by Derek Griffiths on May 23, 2017 in Regional News It makes sense that Brent Friesth, owner of Bolder Insurance, would be a major sponsor of the Bolder Boulder this year. After all, Brent is a former elite runner. Brent has run over 30 Bolder Boulders with a personal record of 30:59, many of these in the Elite Field. He also set a Vail Hill Climb record in 1985, beating Bolder Boulder Founder Frank Shorter’s record. So, on May 27 and 28, Brent will join his staff at the Bolder Insurance booth on Pearl Street for all the Bolder Boulder festivities taking place that weekend as well as participate in this years 10K race. “Our business was built on the running community. When we started in the insurance industry in 1989, most of our customers were local runners and pro-athletes. So this year, we are proud to have the opportunity to have Bolder Insurance give back to the community that helped us start it all,” Friesth said. While Brent boasts a long record of running accomplishments including winning the Napa Valley Marathon in 1988 and qualifying for the Olympic Marathon Trials in 1988 and 1992, he has never forgotten the camaraderie and friendships he forged with this community, many of who are still his clients. At its booth, Bolder Insurance will host a morning and afternoon session of autograph signing and photo opportunities with some major World Class athletes. Such notables as Arturo Barrios, Alan Culpepper, and possibly Frank Shorter will be there. Also, attendees who visit the...

Boating Safety: All Hands On Deck!

Each time you set out on the lakes and waterways with your boat, take time to review some basic safety tips. First, make sure everyone who drives your boat knows the basic rules about right of way, speed limits, ski restrictions and equipment condition. Improve operating skills by completing a course. Contact the department of natural resources in your state to find boating classes, or contact the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or Power Squadron. For information about vessel safety and other boating resources, visit the Coast Guard’s Boating Safety Resource Center Keep in mind: Half of all personal watercraft accidents involve operators with less than 20 hours of experience. Thirty-five percent involve riders under age 21. Follow all U.S. Coast Guard regulations for life jackets and safety equipment. Keep enough air pressure in trailer tires. Low pressure at high speeds causes accidents. Be sure your drain plugs are installed. Many boaters have launched the craft from a trailer with the drains open. Periodically recheck the motor bracket clamps for firmness. A safety chain secured to the boat can keep the motor from falling entirely into the water. Open the hatch or operate the blower before starting an inboard engine. Gasoline fumes are dangerous. Guard against theft; don’t leave your boat, motor or equipment unattended. Take equipment not permanently attached or locked away with you when leaving the boat. Keep firefighting and lifesaving equipment in good condition. This equipment should be readily available. The first few seconds are the most important. Use an electric engraver to label your equipment. Before leaving your boat, be certain stoves, lights or lanterns and switches...

Preserve your prized jewelry and watches

Jewelry and watches have a strong appeal to many people. They can represent sentiment, personal adornment, private assets, family heirlooms and collectible works of art. Because of their unique value, jewelry worn today should be preserved for tomorrow. Consider the following tips to help protect your jewelry: Store jewelry in a clean, protected location, such as a jewelry box. Place jewelry in separated compartments because some metals and gemstones scratch or chip more easily than others. Some boxes include individually padded slots for rings and provide posts for hanging necklaces and bracelets. Consider installing a secured safe within your home to prevent theft. Keep your most precious items or items you wear infrequently in a bank vault or safe deposit box. In addition to preventing theft or misplacement, you may also save on insurance premiums. Prepare an inventory of your watches and jewelry, just as you would all of your property. Take photos and keep purchase receipts. Store a copy offsite. Take extra steps when traveling: Photograph jewelry you plan to take with you in case an item is lost or stolen. Pack jewelry in your carry-on bag, not in checked luggage. Keep your most expensive items with you at all times. Place unattended jewelry in a locked safe or vault under hotel management supervision rather than in your hotel room safe. Examine the condition of each item on a regular basis. Check for loose settings, weak clasps and worn strings. Have any weaknesses or damage repaired as soon as possible. Visit a professional about every 6 months to have your jewelry professionally cleaned and inspected. Schedule a jewelry...

Mike Sandrock: Tempo Runs can help Bolder Boulder wave qualifiers

The following articles was published in the Daily Camera, April 17, 2017 Mike Sandrock: Tempo Runs can help Bolder Boulder wave qualifiers By Mike Sandrock,  Boulder Daily Camera While only one runner out there is going to win the Memorial Day Bolder Boulder 10K —- and no, it is likely not going to be me or you —- the rest of us can “win” by reaching our own personal goals that provide a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. These can range from simply covering the entire 6.2 mile distance for the first time to setting a personal best on the course. One key goal for many Bolder entrants is qualifying for one of the first 32 “waves,” or starting groups of the 100 total that will set off at varying time intervals Memorial Day morning. Non-runners might ask, “What difference does it make if someone starts in the ‘C’ or the ‘EE’ wave?” I can say it makes a big difference. The last time I raced the Bolder Boulder, I felt first-hand how good it felt to get the “AA” qualifier, meaning I could run on the Boulder Road Runners team. The most important reason for training for and getting a wave qualifier is what Todd Straka calls the “Goldilocks” effect. “It is like Goldilocks,” said Straka, an “A” wave qualifier who puts on the weekly Tuesday night Dash & Dine 5k race series at Boulder Reservoir. “You are running with people who are not too fast for your pace and not too slow so that you have to move around them. Everyone (in a respective wave) is around the...

Help your employees fight distracted driving

Every business owner wants to see that employees get safely to the jobsite or that cargo or products are safely delivered to their customers. Every year, distracted driving becomes a bigger barrier in the way of that goal. The primary task of anyone behind the steering wheel of a car or truck is to safely control that vehicle on and off the highway. All too often we see a news report that starts with something like, “This morning’s fatal auto accident on the inbound expressway was caused when a distracted driver…” Driver distraction is anything that diverts the driver’s attention away from the driving task onto another activity. In 2014, 10 percent of fatal crashes, 18 percent of injury crashes and 16 percent of all police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes were reported as distraction-affected crashes according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) figures. That year, 3,179 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver and 431,000 people were injured, the agency noted. Distractions can come from many sources – both inside and outside the vehicle. It used to be that the biggest concern was distractions from outside the vehicle. That is changing. Along with driving the vehicle, drivers are often trying to perform secondary tasks such as texting and talking on cellphones, monitoring GPS systems, tuning the radio to another station, or interacting with passengers. These secondary activities can all take the driver’s eyes off the road and mind away from attentive driving. Automobile and mobile device manufacturers are continually coming out with new equipment that they say will help reduce these driver distractions. New hands-free and voice...